Other Treatments 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Stroke Rehabilitation 

A stroke is caused when a blood clot or haemorrhage in the brain causes the blood supply to a part of the brain to cut off. This is a very serious medical condition and it needs to be treated immediately. 
 
If you have recently had a stroke, you will have a better chance of a good recovery if you commence physiotherapy rehabilitation as soon as possible after returning home from the hospital. You will find that your movement will be affected and you may experience numbness or weakness in your arm and/or leg or face. The affected side may feel very different, with the limbs feeling heavy and possibly painful and you may also have issues with your posture and balance. 
 
Physiotherapy is an important part of your recovery and it will help you learn how to use both sides of your body again and gain back as much muscle strength and range of movement as possible. At Bodyworks we can help you regain your mobility and independence. 
 
A stroke can have a huge impact on someone's life and it can affect them in many different ways. We are very aware that rehabilitation for stroke survivors is very personal to each individual and so aims for her assessments and treatments to reflect this. We can also advise your family or your carer on how to help you with mobility on a daily basis. 

Vertigo / Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) 

 
 
 
In Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) dizziness is thought to be due to debris which has collected within a part of the inner ear. This debris can be thought of as "ear rocks", although the formal name is "otoconia". These are small crystals of calcium carbonate derived from a structure in the ear called the "utricle". The utricle may have been damaged by head injury, infection, or other disorder of the inner ear, or may have degenerated because of advanced age.  
BPPV is a common cause of dizziness. About 20% of all dizziness is due to BPPV. The older you are, the more likely it is that your dizziness is due to BPPV, as about 50% of all dizziness in older people is due to BPPV.  
The symptoms of BPPV include dizziness or vertigo, light headedness, imbalance, and nausea. Activities which bring on symptoms will vary among persons, but symptoms are almost always precipitated by a change of position of the head with respect to gravity. Getting out of bed or rolling over in bed are common "problem" motions. An intermittent pattern is common. BPPV may be present for a few weeks, then stop, and then come back again. 
 
Treatment: 
Dix-Hallpike Manoeuver 
Canalith repositioning - Epley Manoeuver 
Brandt-Daroff Exercises 
Cooksey Cawthorne Exercises 
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